tsubame: (wings)
Friday, June 10th, 2011 02:45 pm
"If you want to build a ship, don't drum up people together to collect wood and don't assign them tasks and work, but rather teach them to long for the endless immensity of the sea."

~Antoine de Saint-Exupery

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I was discussing the concept of “good” vampires with Lázár. The group encountered a family of vampires who were living a life in which they didn’t harm humans-- instead they sponsored a blood bank and lived fairly normal lives. That they were killed meant that all the other vampires would see little point in being “good,” since they would be targets anyway.

His answer surprised me: “If they were just doing it to avoid getting iced, they still f--ing deserve to get iced.”


What he meant was that the vampires would only be behaving themselves to avoid the chance of being killed. If that threat was removed, they would go back to less wholesome habits. And there was no guarantee that the threat would always be there. External motivation wouldn’t be enough; the behavior cannot be trusted without internal motivation.

Tokugawa is still at the front of my head, since her game ended only recently, and she spoke up: “The threat is like a poised hammer; you worry what might happen if the hammer is removed. Bring the hammer down a few times. After that it will not matter if the hammer is actually there or not; it will remain always in their minds.”

What she meant was that if there are a few demonstrative punishments, people will fear the punishment and remember it, and behave themselves to avoid it. Once that is in effect you will no longer have to punish people.

. . . they both scare me.

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Variations on the Word Sleep, by Margaret Atwood )
tsubame: (sleepy)
Sunday, June 5th, 2011 10:56 pm
Where are you, unicorn?

Some years ago I got tired of waiting. If you wouldn't come to find me, well then: I would go searching, and find you.

Many a pair of shoes I have worn thin, walking over this earth. Many wonders have I seen. I have had joys and sorrows, fears-- so many fears. And still I haven't found you.

I'm still looking.

Still waiting.

Will you never come to me?
tsubame: (wings)
Wednesday, June 1st, 2011 02:30 am
A fascinating link regarding a great editor.

Crowd-sourced publishing. An interesting idea, though we’ll have to wait and see how it goes.

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Edinburgh bears the unfortunate label of “not Japan” in my head, and so I tend to give the place short shrift, and easily forget just how lucky I am to be here. Since the culture and language are much closer to that of my native place, I don’t experience the same degree of foreign-ness, and so I don’t appreciate the city as much as I should.

So it’s good for me to go by North Bridge every once and a while, because out of all the places in the city somehow the view from their reminds me of just how lucky I am. And it reminds me that Edinburgh is an incredible place, a vision in buff stone, a place of history and wonders and mysteries if only I dig beneath the everyday to find them.

And it figures that I don’t have any particularly great photos of the view from there. It’s rather difficult to capture such a grand view on a 2D camera-- half the magnificence is the wonders receding further back into space. Carlton Hill with its whimsical structures falling away to the sky and the far-off waters of the ocean, seagulls wheeling in the wind, the impressive sweep of the bridge over the great ravine that holds the train station, the height of the hills on either side, the ornate stone buildings decorated with mythic beasts and reclining gods . . .

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Here’s the one shot I do have of Carlton Hill. They hold the Samhain and Beltain celebrations up there-- both of which I missed, alas. But if I were going to pick a likely spot for magic in Edinburgh this’d be it, with the eclectic buildings, the observatory dome, the obelisk, the tower. It would be a great location for a school of wizardry, a part of the town and yet separate, a lofty place between land and sea, sky and rock, looking over both the cultured city and the barren wildness of Arthur’s Seat.

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I wanted to put up more writing for [livejournal.com profile] saiun_challenge’s birthday celebration, but alas it seems this is all I’m going to manage. And I still have one more bit to write before it’s really complete! ::sobs:: Oh, and I haven’t edited it yet, so it’s probably so terrible as to be embarrassing. But I’m too tired to look it over now, and the deadline will be past if I wait to do so until I’ve had some sleep.

This AU makes me nostalgic for high school. How weird.

Dark Jewels Saiunkoku

Roseford's Queen: Part 1
Roseford's Queen: Part 2
Roseford’s Queen: Part 3

Roseford’s Queen: Part 4 )
tsubame: (demon gold)
Friday, May 20th, 2011 12:59 pm
This is possibly the saddest thing I have ever written for Saiunkoku.

the Death of the Heart )

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BWWWWWAAAAAAAAAHHHHHH.

::bawls::

Somebody better put up something fluffy, STAT.
tsubame: (yue)
Thursday, May 12th, 2011 12:49 am
Osama bin Laden was killed, and across the USA people celebrated. I’m very glad I wasn’t in the USA; the thought of the people cheering in the streets disgusts me. But I thought that I should clarify, somewhere, why.

Some 10 years ago, a man persuaded some other men that they should die, and kill a lot of other people at the same time.

They died, and in the process killed a lot of people.

In the streets, some people celebrated. In the streets, many people mourned.

As a result, two wars began. Many people died. Many people killed other people. And many of those people died.

10 years after 10 years ago, some people killed that man.

In the streets, many people celebrated. In the streets, surely there are many people who mourn. There must be, because thousands upon thousands of people are dead.

Maybe, somewhere, there’s a god who sorts it all out. Maybe all those people will return to the wheel, to make the same mistakes again in another life.

Or maybe they’re all just dead.

And no one has learned anything at all.

Osama bin Laden was killed. How do I feel?

I feel sad.
tsubame: (reading)
Monday, May 9th, 2011 11:17 pm
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One of the views from St. Michael’s Bridge in Ghent. You just kinda stand in the middle of the bridge and turn in a circle, and it’s amazing no matter which way you look. You can see all the major sites from right there-- castle, cathedrals, churches, bell tower, canals . . .

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30 April 2011 (continued) )

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A picture from Sensei’s concert: Kurahashi Yodo and Ronald Brautigam, 28 April 2011, De Bijloke Muziekcentrum, Ghent

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1 May 2011 )

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A cup of chocolate in a Brugges cafe.
tsubame: (reading)
Sunday, May 8th, 2011 06:03 pm
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Taken in Brugges during my first afternoon walking around there. I found a great deal of gorgeously blooming wisteria on my travels-- I never knew it smelled so nice. Sensei spent some time trying to get me to say “藤” and “藤壷” correctly. You’d think it wouldn’t be that hard, but I had a terrible time . . .

Transcripts of my writings from my recent trip to Ghent, Brugges, and Leiden.

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26 April 2011 )

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27 April 2011 )

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28 April 2011 )

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30 April 2011 )

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Sonnet XXX, by William Shakespeare (painted on a wall in Leiden) )

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“But now we are all, in all places, strangers and pilgrims, travelers and sojourners . . .”

~Robert Cushman, Pilgrim Leader, 1622

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Poem 23, by e e cummings (painted on a wall in Leiden) )
tsubame: (hey!)
Friday, May 6th, 2011 04:04 pm
As per the excellent [livejournal.com profile] apis_cerana:

Originally posted by [livejournal.com profile] heeroluva at "Suspicious comments" and "Spam comments": LJ decision to 'block' spam is a big FAIL!
So I've been noticing in both my own journal and communities that I haven't been able to see some comments even thought it says there are more comments there than are actually showing up. Instead I'm getting a place holder that says (Spam comment) or (Suspicious comment).

Why are these showing up like this you may ask? In their rush to fight spam LJ has created a new filter that're AUTOMATICALLY TURNED ON in ALL journals and communities, which screens comments that are made with 'suspicious links' ie links that are not on their safe whitelist, so pretty much the majority of the internet. There is no noted way to add to the 'whitelist'.

What really gets me is that they didn't inform people that they were doing this until a week after it was done and that it was automatically turned on.

So how do I turn it off you might ask.

That's simple. Go to your Settings, click on the Privacy tab, and half way down where it says Spam Protection uncheck the box next to "Comments containing a link to a non-whitelisted domain will be marked as spam and moved to a special section." This applies to both personal journal and communities and the opinion has to be manually changed in each one.

While I understand how this could be a good idea, I think they went about it in a very backhanded way, and have implemented it poorly. There was no message to anyone that the link has been screened. It's automatically done. This went on for over a week before they said anything about it. There is still nothing in the FAQs about it even. The only way I found out about this way going through the support pages where people were reporting similar issues.

Please share this!



ETA: This link really illustrates the problems.


Man, I'm used to having to do this kind of stupid stuff with Facebook . . . now LJ too?
tsubame: (foot-mouth)
Thursday, May 5th, 2011 09:46 am
It happens to be the birthday month of [livejournal.com profile] saiun_challenge, which means I need to post a bunch of fics that haven’t gone up thus far. So prepare yourself for an invasion of Saiunkoku AUs . . .

The first being a continuation of one of my previously-posted AUs, which I very simply titled “College” (link is to the ff.net page, since I can’t find the LJ post at the moment). It’s purest insanity. The continuing adventures of Seiran and Ensei. At college. Warnings for language.

College: Unfortunate Acquaintances )
tsubame: (hey!)
Sunday, April 24th, 2011 05:45 pm
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From the Royal Palace (Preah Barom Reachea Veang Chaktomuk) in Phnom Penh, Cambodia. A delightful building whose sole purpose is to allow the king to get onto his elephant in an appropriately royal and dignified way.

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I don’t ever want to settle for good enough. I don’t want to resign myself to getting by. I don’t want to just dream things. I don’t want to be envious of what others have done; I want to do them myself. I want my life to be the dream.

But trying to do it is so damn scary. The nagging fear is always there-- what if I can’t do it? What if I don’t measure up?

Because I know, beyond all reasonable doubt, that there is nothing particularly special about me. I don’t stand out in any way-- not in appearance, personality, or intellect. Beyond my obscure interests, I’m an utterly normal person, no better or worse than anyone else. I don’t have any particular talents. Anything that I’m good at, I’m good at only because I’ve put in a ridiculous amount of effort to become good at it.

The only thing I really have going for me is luck.

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Today is Easter Sunday, and it’s the first time in years that I’ve been in a country where that actually means something. Although not so much to me, living on my own. Once upon a time Easter meant I went to church with my family, sang in the choir, and then came home to cook and eat a big family meal. Now, well . . . it’s Sunday, and like every Sunday I will call my family and go to my game, and spend the rest of the time as I see fit.

Nowadays I pick up gods along my travels. Can I say that I believe? Not with the devotion of religion-- I have experienced it, but I cannot find it in me any longer. That is to say, in my wanderings physical and mental, I have found no holy book which gave good reason why I should prize it above all other holy books. No single truth above all other truths.

So I seek to be respectful to all religions, to learn about all religions. Because I’m interested in religion, though I’m not particularly eager to take one for myself. “Spiritual rather than religious” is the mantra of many, but I don’t think it’s a fit for me. Rather than religion, rather than spirituality, I prefer philosophy.

And to find my gods where I may.

I have felt religious awe in places disparate; places with a religious function, places without. Have felt it around certain people, have felt it in certain people. Places and people who belonged to different religions, or no religions at all. Even in animals I have found it; god in the liquid eye of a deer, the flicker of light on a school of silver fish. I cannot discriminate between them; the feeling was the same. And I have participated in religious services of all kinds, whole-heartedly and respectfully, without feeling that I betrayed anyone or anything.

Choose. Choose one. That’s what everyone wants. Choose one religion, one book, one pantheon, one mythology, one philosophy, one star, one question, one name, one explanation, one equation, one interest, one area, one country, one book, one style, one life, one instrument, one viewpoint, one door, one one one one one.

No.

In a world of such fantastic diversity, such immense and glorious variety, how can I possibly pick? Why must I? The world contains multitudes; I am a world; I contain multitudes. If I must choose, I choose everything.

My one thing is everything.
tsubame: (foot-mouth)
Thursday, March 31st, 2011 11:10 pm
I have FINALLY FINALLY FINALLY finished chapter 3 of Demon Hunter! We’re not going to talk about how long I’ve been working on it.

Demon Hunter: Previous Installments
Chapter One: Departure
Chapter Two: The Long Road
Chapter Three: Learning Experience (part 1: Gold)

Chapter Three: Learning Experience (part 2: Soap) )

Sidestories
Haunted

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One of my previous roommate's cats, Shunki, as an adolescent, having a stretch on my futon. An absolutely gorgeous cat, and well aware of it. Like my Jackl she was also a rescue-- my friend fished her and her littermates out of a box in a river in Tokyo. All went to good homes and have grown up to be wonderful pets. Shunki and her brother Ensei are now living happily in the United States, where they are referred to fondly by my previous roommate as "her Stupids."

The kanji for Shunki's name is "春姫", which translates to "spring princess." Rarely have name and personality suited each other so well in anyone.

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5 Reasons Humanity is Terrible at Democracy

Deeply interesting and informative reading. Terribly depressing, though.

Bioware Tells Straight Men to "Get Over" Being Hit on By Gay Men in "Dragon Age 2"

Good for them. An intelligent and reasoned response to a complaint probably wasn't either.

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A Color of the Sky, by Tony Hoagland )
Thursday, March 24th, 2011 12:15 am
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Here's a truly exotic location, at least by the standards of my journal . . . my hometown. Yep, that's just outside the local Greek restaurant in April of 2008. They have an AMAZING lamb kokkinisto, the dish that taught me that adding a pinch of cinnamon to your average tomato-based sauce results in awesome.

Picture taken to prove to a politely doubtful Japanese colleague that yes, there are blossoming cherry trees in the United States, and they are in fact beautiful-- as beautiful as their Japanese counterparts. The difference between cherry trees in Japan and cherry trees in the US is of course their extreme cultural significance in one place, and near total lack of cultural significance in the other. Sure, people in the US think that the cherry blossoms are pretty, but they're no more significant than other flowers, and a great deal less significant than some (the rose, for instance). Whereas I couldn't even begin to convey just how significant sakura are in Japanese culture.

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I find myself preoccupied with memories often lately-- I who have always been a child of the present moment. Always with me it has been today's dream, not yesterday's or tomorrow's. But again and again my thoughts drift backwards, and I wonder-- what am I seeking there? And why now?

Memories connect one to another, like beads on a string. I think of my brother, digging in the sand-- the sand at the pool that day we three escaped, trying to pass the painful hours-- the gritty, sticky sand at the Jersey shore, the drumming surf-- summer heat-- walking down from Kiyomizudera under the July sun--

Near my house in Japan, a street corner with a traffic light. I would ride my bike out to begin the day's adventure under a bright blue sky. Fly out across the street, standing on my pedals with the wind in my hair, swoop into the turn that would bring me arrowing down the road through the brilliant green of the rice fields. None happier than I, my heart singing inside of me--

A hundred times surely I did this, and now every time is one time, one moment, a single elation, an eternal singing joy.
tsubame: (yue)
Friday, March 18th, 2011 05:47 pm
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I was in Tibet in the summer of 2007, and it was . . . possibly the most amazing trip I have ever been on. Everything was astounding-- the landscape, the people, the culture-- everything except the food. See that white peak below the prayer flags, briefly emerging from the clouds? That's Chomolungma . . . more commonly known as Mt. Everest.

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L'An Trentiesme De Mon Eage, by Archibald MacLeish

And I have come upon this place
By lost ways, by a nod, by words,
By faces, by an old man's face
At Morlaix lifted to the birds,

By hands upon the tablecloth
At Aldebori's, by the thin
Child's hands that opened to the moth
And let the flutter of the moonlight in,

By hands, by voices, by the voice
Of Mrs. Whitman on the stair,
By Margaret's "If we had the choice
To choose or not - "through her thick hair,

By voices, by the creak and fall
Of footsteps on the upper floor,
By silence waiting in the hall
Between the doorbell and the door,

By words, by voices, a lost way - ,
And here above the chimney stack
The unknown constellations sway -
And by what way shall I go back?
tsubame: (hey!)
Thursday, March 3rd, 2011 12:38 am
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There is a rather remarkable propensity towards flowers in Scotland; hard to believe in a country so far north and yet true. Summer, for instance, is nothing but endless green and gold where I grew up in the States, but here there were more flowering things than I could name. The roses, too, grow splendidly, and last well into fall.

I never did find that camera cord; I ended up replacing it.

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The birds outside our window are dinosaurs. WE NOW HAVE THE BEST FACT.

~xkcd

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while reading the Mauritius Command:

Oh, Stephen. Jack was up all night worrying about you and you come back with an albatross egg and a parrot that speaks French.

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geekery and fanfic in an email today:

I have a crazy Ryuuki, a three-eyed demon Ryuuki, an assassin Ryuuki, a chichi-ue Ryuuki, a Ryuuki hooked up to computers, a ridiculously cute Ryuuki, a Ryuuki with piercings, a courtesan Ryuuki, a dragon Ryuuki . . .

::is beginning to suspect that she's deeply insane::

You know what I don't have? A one-eyed warrior Ryuuki!

::glowing cheerfully at the thought::

::fairly certain that she is quite insane, actually::
tsubame: (combini)
Friday, February 25th, 2011 01:01 am
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My parents and I took the train up to Takayama from Kyoto. It was a spectacular journey through green mountains and sudden gorges carved by white-water rivers. Takayama itself was also gorgeous, even though it poured rain for just about the entire time we were there.

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I've changed my LJ theme, because I needed a bit of sun to get me through the rest of this bleak season. It should be noted that I dislike daisies. There are flowers that I like, though I find that my preferences are very influenced by scent: lillies of the valley, roses, sweet daphne, hyacinths (which I do not like the look of, but they smell delightful). Plum and cherry blossoms (I prefer the former, but if it's dessert time sakura all the way). Morning glories (though they have no scent at all). I have a fondness for snowdrops because they come up first, and crocuses for coming up after to say that spring's really arrived.

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A haiku cannot
be ordered, it must spring forth
spontaneously.
tsubame: (yue)
Tuesday, February 15th, 2011 01:14 am
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This is a picture I took in Lyon in France. I decided to go to the city quite randomly because I had heard their food praised especially highly. Lyon is a fairly small city, but I enjoyed it (even though we did end up doing a lot of random stuff while we were there, so that we could be indoors. The weather during our stay was, unfortunately, awful). This horse was in the Museum of Miniatures (and also random movie paraphernalia). It's not really a miniature, exactly, nor is it from a movie, but it is pretty darn cool. Below is a photo of the information card that accompanied it.

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A perfect night, the cool air nipping at my face, the lamplight glittering gold off the wet pavement, the dark holes of puddles interupted by the ripples of occasional raindrops. The slate roofs shine pewter. The night sky a patchwork of indigo, the clouds a luminous grey-blue. A dark tree grows in the center of the park; directly above the white pearl of the moon bears a cavorting rabbit. The still canal reflects all, the darkness and the light; a houseboat is moored, green-black and gilded by the lamps. Hyde's voice in my ears, and I am alone this night, my heart is still and peaceful.

Would that I could take this beautiful moment, this perfect feeling, and wrap it in a box and give it to you.

tsubame: (reading)
Wednesday, January 26th, 2011 11:37 pm
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This photo was taken in Kyoto this past summer, during the run-up to the Gion Matsuri. Various neighborhoods in the city construct massive wooden floats, gloriously decorated, and for a week before the festival these floats are lit up at night and most of the city becomes a giant festival. I took this outside one of the "home bases" of one of the floats: the float topped with a staff bearing a crescent moon, hence the moon character you can see on one of the lanterns. Straw rope usually denotes a holy place, although these divisions can be treated so casually as to shock Westerners with more rigid ideas about sacred spaces. I can't claim to understand these things myself, having done no in-depth study about it. But a torii gate does much the same thing, and these can stand over a busy pedestrian commercial street without anyone feeling there is any conflict in this blend of the mundane and the divine.


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What do I do on a Wednesday night? After I have been at school since 9 in the morning, having spent the entire day in meetings, consultations, presentations, brainstorming sessions, discussions, and hard work? When I ate my breakfast on the walk to school, spent my lunch in a CV surgery session, and ate my dinner in 5 minutes before I went to Japanese class for two hours? And then walked home afterwards to arrive at 10 PM, a half-hour uphill hike?

Sit at my computer and read scholarly blog posts, of course.

[livejournal.com profile] subsiding_leaf posted a link to this academic blog post on friendship, which is absolutely fascinating. I recommend reading the comments as well, they're quite interesting.

I had a boyfriend a few months ago, which probably surprised the hell out of anyone who knows me-- I admit to being a bit puzzled about the whole thing myself (still am). He was puzzled that I told him I absolutely wouldn't cancel plans I had previously made to see my friends in order to hang out with him. I was puzzled at his puzzlement.

It's hard for me to think of any relationship that can be stronger and more important than some of the friendships I've known. The only thing I can think of that comes close for me is my family-- and actually, I tend to think of those bonds as friendships, too. I'm endlessly grateful for the blood relationship, because if not for that I probably wouldn't have had the opportunity to become friends with such a diverse group of people.

The article I mentioned above contains further links to a series of lectures on the subject of friendship, which ironically took place here in Edinburgh. I haven't watched them yet, but I hope to sometime soon. One of them is over here on YouTube, and is an hour long.

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In other news, I can't help but approve of stories like this. Fair play to the fox!

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"There are things lurking in my saved draft posts that would make a heartbroken 14 year old go 'oh come on, that's a bit much.'"

Ysengrin does not like hugs. He punishes them with words of wisdom.
Friday, January 21st, 2011 12:48 am
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Some of my friends in front of one of the great trees of Koya-san in Wakayama-ken. It is the center of the Shingon sect of Buddhism, and it's . . . amazing. There are more than 120 temples there, and a lovely and tranquil graveyard that takes several hours to walk through. It felt like another world, up there amongst the peaks.

I wanted to put up this picture because my incredibly-PC-calendar (it has Thich Nhat Hanh quotes!) lists Thursday as Tu B'Shevat (the Jewish New Year for Trees). According to teh interwebs this is the date when the trees begin to flower in Jereusalem. Other than that I know nothing of the significance of the holiday, but I think it a beautiful thing that there should be a new year devoted to trees.

Of course, since I believe Jewish holidays start on the previous night at sundown, I guess this holiday is already over . . .

Behind which I ramble on insanely about Pandora Hearts. Replete with question marks, because every time I learn something in this blasted series I end up with 5 new questions. er. EDIT: FULL OF SPOILERS. I should have said that before, sorry. )
Thursday, January 20th, 2011 12:54 am
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Last spring I was able to go to a huge roller coaster park in Japan with some of my friends. Among the ten coasters in the park they also happen to have the world's largest wooden one; this is a view of it from the nearby Ferris wheel. I rode it once, but found that it gave me a pounding headache. Looks like I've gotten too old for wooden roller coasters. I did fine on the modern ones, though.

I might also have been more prone to headaches at the time, seeing as my parents were visiting. When my parents visited me in Japan I was usually in a state of high stress and constant sleep deprivation/exhaustion.

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Wednesdays are going to be my busy days; biweekly that means class from 9 AM to 9:30 PM, with an hour's break for lunch and dinner/transport each. And then walking 40 minutes home. Today was the first of them, and actually I found myself enjoying it. I like being busy; it makes me feel useful. Which explains why I so mercilessly over-scheduled myself while I lived in Japan; I did in fact enjoy it.

I've actually been rather lazy since coming to Scotland. I think I need to take further steps to remedy this.

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Over the vacation I had a chance for some long talks with my various family members, some of which were quite interesting.

Regarding a conversation with my little brother with attendant thoughts which cover socialism in Sweden, the causes of the American Civil War, rappers, and lottery tickets. )

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I had half an hour during my busiest busy day in which to procure dinner. I wanted to go to the Black Medicine coffee house, because its name is so cool, but I ended up wandering the wrong way. I was thinking thoughts of going into the KFC-- I was running out of time-- it would be easy to order there-- but at the last second I gave in to the terrible yellow plastic beacon of a down-at-the-heels middle eastern place with cheap battered tables and faded posters of deserts on the walls.

And glad I was to have done so. Their baba ganoush was LOVELY. And I found out that the "sh" sound at the end has a bit of a hard "g" sound in it. I am enlightened!

. . . okay, nowhere near. But I get a little closer every day!

xOx xOx xOx xOx xOx xOx xOx xOx xOx xOx xOx xOx


I found some fun and interesting things on the internet recently. Let me share them with you!

A friend who is obsessed with a cartoon show called Phineas and Ferb linked me to this episode which makes reference to Carmell Dansen. At which point I told her that about two years ago Japan discovered this song in its original Swedish. And before long ALL OF JAPAN WAS INFECTED. It caught on so hugely that every anime currently on the air (and many who just have extremely obsessive fans) was making their own version of it (Jack Sparrow's at 2.16, fyi).

The same friend taught me a new French phrase!

déjà moo - the distinct feeling that you've heard this bull before

My stock of French phrases is growing once again! I can now add this gem of wisdom to my recently-acquired "tes moeurs crapuleuses" ("your sordid morals") and "tu cherches à corrompre mon paresseux" ("you are trying to corrupt my sloth"). Thankee, Patrick O'Brian!

This picture is my current desktop walllpaper. About which I said . . . )

To which my adorable sister replied... )

She's so cute! <3

This comic is quite adorable.

Reading through Pandora Hearts led to this string of (mostly) non-spoiler comments on Facebook:

Comments Ahoy! )
tsubame: (reading)
Sunday, January 16th, 2011 04:31 pm
Continuing on yesterday's theme . . .

Photobucket

This is one of the meals that I ate at the Copain Copine, my very favorite Korean restaurant in Tokyo. It's near Tokyo Station on the outskirts of Ginza, tucked under the railway tracks with a bunch of other really cool little restaurants and cafes. Except I never went to any of the others because I would always go back there after the first time. Made it a point to eat there every time I was in Tokyo. The wait staff were very friendly and kind, the host was really pritty, and the decour was homey and yet lovely. Oh, and the food was awesome, too.

And, while I'm at it . . .

The First Dream, by Billy Collins )